I don’t like Virtual Machines

I don’t like virtual machines. Give that my current position and employer involves building, maintaining, supporting, optimizing, and selling solutions/services this statement is a bit ironic. I don’t hate the benefits that the technology has given us. It’s amazing about what it has provided. It’s also amazing how you can scale up a service without having to bring in lots of new hardware and maintain that as well. It’s more efficient and cost effective than the old way of doing things. It has progressed development of operating systems, and drivers.

The problem I have with virtual machines involves more of the context of what they are. In a very simple manner, a VM is an emulation of a physical machine run within a computer, also known as a hypervisor. Oftentimes, lots of virtual machines are run on the same box by using systems like VMWare ESX server, Zen, or KVM. Very frequently the difference between a physical machine and a virtual machine are very little. The differences show up with 3D/low-latency applications and VMs that depend on hardware input that cannot be emulated (I.E. number generation on VMs).  After reading that previous statement, and considering the downside, there should be something that sticks out to you. It’s something that should make you feel uncomfortable.

For me, I’m made very uncomfortable in the fact that we have many VMs running on the same box. Much of the processing, storage, and memory are consumed by redundant operating system processes, and/or files associated.  This seems really inefficient to have 30 instances of Windows Server 2012 all running IIS at the same time. The alternative to this madness is through the use of containers. I like the idea. I would love to get a chance to learn more about OpenVZ and LXC when I get more time. I like containers because they are sandboxed/managed containers which pushes the processing ability onto the actual job being performed. It feels more efficient, and more inlined with solving the problem rather than creating more infrastructure.

Prior to the virtualization era: We were encouraged to build grid services. This was great, you could throw a lot of machines at a problem and had them work in harmony. However, that didn’t work as well as we hoped due to the immature tools and frameworks offered at the time. In replacement of grid computing, the next approach was to split the problem up into individual processing united and to just to throw a lot of machines at the problem. After VMs are “nearly-free.” This really doesn’t fix the problem, it just seems like we’re timesharing on a powerful server once again.

3 thoughts on “I don’t like Virtual Machines”

  1. Yes, things like Docker are awesome: but VMs are far better when it comes to segregation of independent process (and/or customer) data.

    They’re no panacea, but they’re pretty awesome.

      1. it’s needed every time you have multiple customers running

        it’s needed every time you have processes which may run amok and you can’t afford for them to kill something else

        🙂

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